Category: Parenting

You Are Proof That Miracles Do Exist

You Are Proof That Miracles Do Exist

My Dearest Daughter,

It has been four years since the moment I met you. Four Years! They weren’t kidding when they said ‘time will fly by’. And it sure has. It’s all very bittersweet. It’s such a privilege to watch you grow up. To watch life blossom before my eyes. To see you become your own unique person. And while you have grown, so have I.

You see, when I knew you were coming into this world I was somewhat terrified. I always wondered how I would be as a mom. If I would be any good at it. But more so, I wondered how diabetes would play into my pregnancy and motherhood. With this disease that I’ve had since I was a kid, I was told could not only cause harm to me, but also to you if I wasn’t diligently on top of it. However, knowing the risks and everything involved, I wasn’t going to let diabetes stop me from my hopes and dreams.

Believe it or not, you saved me. In every which way. You were and ARE my driving force. I had to take a step back and see the bigger picture. It was no longer about me. It was about how I needed to take this challenge,  and work harder than I’ve ever have before—and for many years to come. Because in order to give you the best life, I HAVE to be here. You broke down my walls, and helped me face my biggest insecurities, doubts, and fears.

It was because of you that I started on an insulin pump. I traveled 2 hours every other week, and 2 hours several times a week later on in my pregnancy just to hear your heartbeat. To be honest, it was actually a blessing to be able to get those extra scans and capture those special memories. I would lay awake at night to feel kicks and count them, I would test my blood sugars 10 or more times a day, and I hardly slept much at all. But all the extra work I put in for you to be here—was SO worth it.

I remember being so excited to find out you were a girl. I always envisioned of having a girl first. I guess god knew exactly what I needed. Now everyday when I manage my diabetes, things don’t seem that bad. I see your interest. I hear your concern over what my blood sugar is. Or if I ate something recently. And you realize that it’s a huge part of my life. It breaks my heart to have to explain this disease to you. That one day, you will have to know what to do in case of emergency. I never wanted to put this burden onto you, but it’s amazing how you embrace it, as if it’s all you know.

With you—my faith has grown stronger. I wake up everyday and am truly grateful that despite this ugly, cruel disease you have made me a mother. You are my first child, my only daughter, and you will always hold a special place in my heart. You have given me a new perspective on life. I no longer think of the short term, I think long term. I hope that I can set an example for you growing older to never give up, to be strong, to be compassionate, and to always believe in yourself.

Because you have shown me that miracles do exist.

I love you—forever and always



What It's Like Being a Type 1 Diabetic Mother

What It’s Like Being a Type 1 Diabetic Mother

What It’s Like Being a Type 1 Diabetic Mother

(Guest Post)

I guess this is not as much a story as it is a ‘thank you’. Thank you for shining some light on parents with diabetic children, and what it’s like being a type 1 diabetic mother.

Working full time, being at every event of your child’s, tending to the house, cooking meals, laundry.. all is tiresome, but being a type 1 diabetic mother makes it so much harder! And those who are not diabetic don’t seem to understand. On the outside, I look healthy and happy, but on the inside, I have a body which is constantly attacking itself.

I worry constantly, not only will I be alive long enough to see my now 4 and a half-year-old son grow, but the possibility of him one day carrying the burden I do. I would love to have more children, but knowing how demanding and troubling this disease is on my life — I can’t bear to think of it.

I’m so lucky that to my son understands that ‘mommy taking shots and poking her finger is normal’, but what will he say to his friends? What will his friends say to him? I am trying to teach him to not be ashamed of it and that all people are different and it keeps me alive.

I remember vividly when I was a child, I wasn’t allowed on school field trips or to play with some kids because parents thought their child might catch it — Yes.. like the flu. I have been told it’s all my fault because I was FAT. Fat, me? I was an all-star volleyball player who was also on the swim team and wore a size 4 and was mostly muscle. I was not FAT when I was diagnosed at 3 years old. It has been a constant struggle that many don’t seem to understand.

There is so much more than what’s on the surface.

I feel guilty when i’m too tired from highs and lows to play with my son. I feel guilty when he’s begging to show me something and I have to wait while i calculate and give myself a shot. I feel guilty that I don’t know what the future holds and I want to see him grow old and become a man. I feel guilty, and I have no choice but to teach him about this disease when he’s only a child.

But again – I thank you for making me feel not so alone.



 

I'm a D-Mom Battling Type 1 Diabetes Alongside My Hero

I’m a D-Mom Battling Type 1 Diabetes Alongside My Hero

I’m a D-Mom Battling Type 1 Diabetes Alongside My Hero

a heart set on pilgrimage (Blog) | Instagram | Facebook

I am a woman.
I am a daughter.
I am a sister, a cousin, a niece, a friend, a ballet teacher, a one-person business owner.
I am a wife.

And twelve years ago I voluntarily signed up for motherhood too. I am the mom of two beautiful girls. I adore being their mom. But one year and four months ago, my previous notion of motherhood underwent remodeling and I involuntarily got signed up for a title I wasn’t even aware existed.

I became a D-Mom. 

I wish I could say that the D stood for something like Dazzling or Diligent or Delightful or Dynamic or Darling or Desirable or…

Instead, the D stands for (daunting, dangerous, defiant, depreciating, disheartening) DIABETES.

On 9 March 2015, our eldest daughter was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes. And just like that, our family of four got to wave our pre-diabetes lives goodbye. Together we set out and embarked on a whole new, unfamiliar and scary journey.

A good deal of who we were and where we were heading changed…at the same time much of all of that stayed the same. We still are altogether the same people we were before my daughter’s diagnosis…except…we are…altered.

Redesigned. Revised. Modified. Remolded. Expanded. Evolved.

On a daily basis all four of us get to cultivate bravery and courage; fight battles against worry and all-consuming fear; display our best mathematical skills; employ our finest planning and administrative abilities; pray for a cure…and enough grace and strength to get us through the present day; speak a language stained with medical jargon; fight battles against worry and all-consuming fear… Oh. I already said that.

The moment Type 1 Diabetes, an incurable, chronic, autoimmune disease, arrogantly waltzed into our lives, our lives were altered forever…on various levels:

Even on the level of Motherhood. I went from being a Typical Mom caring for her flock to being a typical mom AND an on-call day/night nurse AND a medical supervisor AND a nutritionist AND a worrier aspiring to become a warrior instead AND a mathematician AND an assistant pancreas AND an advocating voice AND an awareness spreader AND a cheerleader AND a night time blood glucose checker AND a silent crier in the shower AND a researcher AND an educator AND a calculator AND a well timed clock AND a prayer warrior AND a diary keeping track of doctors appointments AND a prescription fetcher AND a co-glucose-tabs-and-snack-carrier AND a double checker of all things T1D related in our household AND a triple checker in that regards AND a quadruple checker for just in case AND an occasional tired and emotionally drained individual.

Yep, I became that mom. I became The D-Mom. My husband became The D-Dad. We became D-Parents. Our youngest daughter became The (supportive and encouraging) D-Sister. My oldest daughter became The D-Warrior. We became a D-Family.

The day my daughter was diagnosed I met Type 1 Diabetes face to face for the very first time. I didn’t know a single person with this disease. I didn’t know a single thing about this disease. Boy, has that changed…

I have learned that Type 1 Diabetes:

Is time consuming;
That it requires daily maintenance 24/7, 7 days a week, 365 days, non-stop, no breaks, zero time off, no prospect of a vacation…ever;
It is a bulk of never ceasing math;
It is quarterly trips to the endocrinologist and a list of specialists you have to work your way through every year;
It is uncountable trips to the pharmacy;
It is struggling with health insurance companies;
It is constant loads of info;
It is to wave certain aspects of freedom goodbye;
It is coming to terms with a chronic disease that will never go away;
It is seeing your daughter prick her finger up to 10 times a day;
It is trying to figure out how stress, a growth spurt, puberty, illness and allergies, heat and vigorous exercise might impact her blood sugars on a single day;
It is to watch your daughter stick a needle in her leg or stomach and give herself 5-7 shots of insulin daily;
It is to hold her and cry with her when she has had a hard day;
It is tiring;
It is chaotic;
It is frustrating;
It is emotionally draining;
It is lonely;
It is hard;
Sometimes it is very scary;
It is ridiculously expensive;
It is to mourn and grieve the loss of a life without diabetes;
It is to stare fear in the face every new morning and then to choose to not be overwhelmed or be defeated by It…Until the next morning when we start this battle against fear all over;
It is a phone call from the school to inform you to come fetch your child because her blood sugar is too high and it won’t come down;
It is to get up at night to test your child’s blood sugar when she is sleeping;
It is to know how quickly you can find yourself down in the valley of the shadow of death, and it is to cry for those families who made one last trip there and came out having had to leave someone behind…

For weeks after my daughter’s diagnosis:

I functioned on auto pilot. I was numb. I was stunned. I was completely overwhelmed by every aspect and detail of this disease and the implications it held for my daughter. The impact it had on her daily life was heartbreaking for my mommy heart to bear witness to. Every day I get to watch my daughter live with a complicated and high maintenance autoimmune disease. Every day she is presented with challenges and demands that comes with this disease. Every day she has to manage this disease in order to stay safe…and alive. Every day. Not some days or most days. But. Every. Single. Day.

BUT, before it gets too depressing…

Being a D-Mom is:

To watch the bravery unfold;
It is to witness courage manifest;
It is to see a fighting spirit being cultivated;
It is to know that there is Grace enough for the steps of each day;
It is being “hard pressed on every side, but not crushed, perplexed, but not in despair”;
It is to hear a small young voice being taught to advocate, direct and teach;
It is to experience the expansion of one’s boundaries of understanding and heartfelt empathy for other parents and families whose children are living with unseen chronic diseases.

I am very aware that we are not alone. There are thousands of brave children doing Type 1 Diabetes around the globe. Every day. And there are thousands of D-Mom ‘s and D-Dads who care for and support their children day in and day out, finger prick by finger prick, shot by shot, pump site change by pump site change, endo appointment by endo appointment.

Even more so there are millions of people who live with other unseen chronic diseases. I never used to know that almost 80 autoimmune diseases existed. Most of these diseases I haven’t even heard of. And for every single one of these people living with one (and sometimes even more than one) of these diseases, there was that moment when they heard their diagnosis for the first time; and a journey that began which they never imagined they will embark upon. There are millions of people with stories to tell. I remind myself of them often. Because my heart has embraced a new level of empathy I never knew was possible.

I’ve learned so very much these past 16 months. I’ve met incredibly brave little people fighting big health battles. I’ve met brave D-Mom ‘s and D-Dads, D-sisters and D-brothers, D-Warriors – young and old. And they are all so much more than this disease. Our family is more than this disease. So is my daughter. So am I.

I have discovered that I still am that Typical Mom I used to be – in spite of the perception that I lost her somewhere. That Typical Mom who loves, and hugs, and disciplines, and lose her temper, and give little backs back rubs at night, and sing wake-up songs in the morning, and oversee (low carb) lunch boxes, and buy groceries (and testing strips), and kiss little cheeks (and little poked fingertips), and whisper I-love-you’s, and reinforce the importance of manners, and bark at clothes lying on the floor, and cuddles her babies… Yes. I still am her. Perhaps an altered and evolved version of her, but I still am her.

I am a woman.
I am a daughter.
I am a sister, a cousin, a niece, a friend, a ballet teacher, a one-person business owner.
I am a wife.

I am a D-mom.


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Mother Of a Type 1 Diabetic (My Mother's Perspective)

Mother Of a Type 1 Diabetic (My Mother’s Perspective)

I asked my mother to write about my diagnosis and the years following. I’ve always wanted to get her perspective as being a mother of a Type 1 Diabetic. Now that I’m a mother, I can empathize with a mother’s love and how far it will go. I wanted her to share her thoughts, fears, and doubts. Now that I’m older and wiser I’ve been able to mourn the loss of the life that didn’t consist of diabetes—and close that chapter in my life. Finding out that diabetes has made me who I am. That when I thought I was handed the wrong card, it actually led me to where I was meant to be. It’s made every success, achievement, or victory just that much sweeter.


Mother Of a Type 1 Diabetic: (My Mother’s Perspective)

 

As a mother your first instinct is to love and protect, that is what I sought out to do. From the day she was born, I felt an overwhelming sense of obligation to fulfill.

But nothing prepared me for what life had in store. In 2002 when she was at the age of 12, I woke in the middle of the night to my child rocking in our recliner. I found it quite odd and I asked: “Brittany what’s wrong”? She replied, “mom I have no saliva and I’m very thirsty”. I knew then something was terribly wrong.

I took her of course to the emergency room. We sat there for what seemed like an eternity. I was told she had to be transported to All Children’s Hospital. Her blood sugar was over 900! By the grace of GOD, she didn’t slip into a coma. That was the day that changed our lives as we know it—even more so for hers.

It felt like someone ran me over. “Type 1 diabetic?” I asked in disbelief. “For how long?” Forever I was told. I didn’t know what to do. I was now a mother of a Type 1 Diabetic, and trying to process all of this at once. I knew nothing about this disease, for this was all new to me. This child that I vowed to protect, I couldn’t protect her from this. I felt like I had failed her and gave her this burden. I didn’t know quite how to feel. I was angry, hurt, and utterly scared for her.

It was life changing. I didn’t know how to keep it together but to see her face look at me, all I knew was that she needed me for strength. I watched her sleep every night, I set my alarm clock because I had to wake her to make sure her blood sugar didn’t drop. I was terrified! This child is my world and I learned quickly how serious this was.

As she grew older of course, like any teenager would she resented being a Type 1 Diabetic. It’s hard enough trying to understand life especially when you’re coming into your own. There’s enough pressure on kids and I tried understanding the pain of what she was feeling. No one her age that she knew was going through this. Having to take injections every day and checking her blood sugar several times a day. Being a mother of a Type 1 Diabetic was hard especially when she was growing up. I knew how difficult it was for her during these years being a Type 1 Diabetic. I wanted to take this from her but I couldn’t.

She was rebellious as all teenagers but more so in the fact, I don’t think she felt normal or understood. I watched her go into the very dangerous low numbers. It was tough because she was incoherent, I couldn’t get her to eat or drink anything. I would call the paramedics and it would take sometimes 20 min. for my baby to come back. There’s nothing more frightening in the world to fear that your child could slip away from your fingertips in the blink of an eye.

It is an absolute life changer, however, it’s not a death sentence. I’m truly grateful we survived those close calls. Looking back I wish I had educated myself more, was involved in support groups and learned more about diabetic cooking tips. I could have never planned for this, but I dealt the best I could and stayed strong for her.

My beautiful daughter has overcome huge obstacles and knows the adversity and the many challenges of this disease. I admire her for her strength and her ability to turn a negative into a positive. Her beauty not only radiates on the outside but on the inside. Her devotion to this cause is not only helping those who need the support, education but also striving for a cure.

Mother Of a Type 1 Diabetic: (My Mother's Perspective)I know that because of her energy and drive, she’s going to make a difference. I believe she has found a purpose in this life—that some of us search for in a lifetime.

To all those battling diabetes you’re not alone in this fight.


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mom with type 1 diabetes

What Life is Like Being a Mom With Type 1 Diabetes

What Life is Like Being a Mom With Type 1 Diabetes

Just like diabetes—motherhood is a lot of work.

Both are full-time jobs.

Not one is more important than the other.

For me— being a mom with Type 1 Diabetes, they both go hand in hand.

I get asked often ‘how do you manage?’ The kids—they mean.

Of course, that’s only half of the equation in my life.

Not many people realize the other half.

The half that I have to continuously battle every day.

Nobody understands how complex and intertwined diabetes is in every aspect of my life.

It’s certainly made me the strong mother that I am today.

But it’s also made me unlike other mothers as well.

I’m the mother who pricks her finger several times a day, and those numbers determining whether it’s safe to attend to my children.

The one who packs for an army to leave the house for a quick errand—but never being fully prepared enough.

The mother who has to take breaks constantly and has to eat the snack that my child wants desperately. Knowing that sometimes I have to come first.

The one who has to go to as many doctor appointments—if not more than my children.

I’m the mother who wants to vent to an open ear but doesn’t think they would understand.

The mother trying to lose weight, only to have a difficult time due to having to treat lows.

I’m one who carries guilt, wanting to be the best mother and not wanting diabetes to inhibit that in any way.

Having to steal a part of my children’s innocence by teaching them about this disease that I wish I could keep from them.

I’m the mother who worries about going to sleep at night—fearing of not waking up in the morning.

Waking up some days feeling like I’ve been run over by a truck and just continuing to push through.

The mother who is constantly attached to devices, and always setting off alarms.

The one with erratic mood swings, an inconsistent schedule, and a low blood sugar peaking around the corner.

I’m the mother who carries around the weight of this disease on her shoulders every day.

Trying to care for others while having to care for myself first.

The one who worries every minute of every day—wondering if I’m doing this right.

I’m the mother who is concerned about the short term implications of this disease and having to accept the long-term effects that correlate.

The mother who works so hard every day at this disease so that I can see my grandchildren one day.

I may have diabetes—but diabetes doesn’t have me. Diabetes has given me the tools to fight. But being a mother has given me the reason to fight. 

Being a mom with Type 1 Diabetes—my life may not be ordinary, easy, or simple.

I may have my bad days, my setbacks, and my doubts.

But I go on despite them.



 

Letter To My Mother (From The Diabetic Herself)

Letter To My Mother (From The Diabetic Herself)

Letter To My Mother (From The Diabetic Herself)

The moment I was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes I didn’t know that my world was going to change.

But you did.

I didn’t see the fear or worried look on your face as it must have felt like your world had been turned upside down.

You held it together for me—you put a smile on your face—and told me everything is going to be okay.

I didn’t witness the nights where you laid awake in bed asking “why this had to happen to me?

Why your daughter—your baby—your piece to the puzzle had to be given this disease.

I didn’t realize the pain I put you through throughout the years when I didn’t want to take care of myself.

When you could have said anything and I would have looked the other way.

No one could save me—not even you.

The sacrifices and the struggles that you dealt with and being a mother is hard regardless.

A single mother going through difficult times of not having insurance.

Barely being able to afford my insulin and supplies.

The times where I dropped a vial of insulin on the kitchen floor by mistake—were cringe worthy moments (I’m sure).

Not having anyone to talk to that understands or even knows what Type 1 Diabetes is.

I know that you would have done anything to take it away from me, even if it meant for you to have it.

Having to worry if I actually checked my blood sugar (or if I lied to ignore it).

If I took the right amount of insulin (or if I took any at all).

Having to save my life countless times—fearing for my life ahead—having the fear of losing me.

Begging for me to wake up to reality and take care of myself or I would end up killing myself.

I’m sorry mom—I didn’t understand.

All I wanted to do was bury my head in the sand and escape the reality of it.

Feeling sorry for myself and not knowing that I’m my own worst enemy.

I thought that this was a life sentence. I didn’t know how beautiful my future was going to be.

I didn’t know at the time that this shall pass. That what doesn’t kill me WILL make me stronger.

That I can do this. 

I know that a mother doesn’t want or need a thank you but now I’m so much more appreciative.

Now I can see it from your perspective.

Now when I look at and kiss my three childrenI can say that I have the world.

The world you always wanted me to have.

I have peace, I have love, I have the future.

Now I understand.

Being a mother is learning about strengths you didn’t know you had, and dealing with fears you didn’t know existed.

I would go to the ends of the earth for my children. No questions asked.

Despite my hardships—I found lessons—I found purpose—I found out why I have diabetes.

Why I’m still here today.

This right here…this is my purpose.


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Motherhood and Diabetes – Not All Superheroes Wear Capes

Motherhood and Diabetes

Becoming a mother has changed all our lives. We appreciate each day more than before. Every hug, every kiss, every “I love you mom“. Even though we make it look easy, it’s a constant struggle. We fight to be here, we fight for our health, for our future, and most importantly for our babies. Not a moment is taken for granted.

 

Not all superheroes wear capes. We often wear spit up, food, blood, tears, sweat, and even an insulin pump. 

 

There’s never a dull moment being a diabetic mother. With all the difficulties that motherhood brings, we face diabetes on top of it all. But we continue to set the bar high, to do better, to challenge ourselves, and make our children proud.

 

They keep us going after all. Our children are our saviors, and we are blessed to be their mothers.

***

Happy Mothers Day

To the whole diabetes community for your strength, courage, and perseverance (you are all true diabetic superheroes).

Amanda

Being a type 1 Diabetic mom has made me realize how tough it is to raise a child that has diabetes…my poor mom and what I put her through….I only hope my daughters will not get diagnosed with it, but it is a worry that I have every day of my life…on the other hand, it never lets me forget how precious every minute of the day is and how much more I want to be in control of my sugars for the sake of my two daughters…I want to see them grow up, and they deserve to have a happy, healthy, mommy!

 

Katharine (Kathy)

Motherhood and diabetes has made me realize just how much of a miracle my son is and how much you can accomplish no matter what cards you have been dealt. On August 16, 2007, I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, just 2 months before getting married at the age of 26. I thought I would never forget that day because of my life changing diagnosis. For the following 5 anniversaries, I pondered on my new life while remembering with grief the life I lost. But on my 6th anniversary of diagnosis, my son was born. August 16th became the best day of my life instead of the worst. I had a rough pregnancy and even harder birth experience. And learning to care for a newborn while managing this disease was something I didn’t think I would find strength for. But then I realized my reason to go on, my reason for fighting this disease every day, was right in front of me. My son is now the reason I push through on the hard days. I do it for him. And I am thankful he gave me a reason to celebrate August 16th instead of mourning it. I am a diabetic mommy. And I am stronger person because of it.

  

Becky

Becoming a mom made me realize that I had to focus & start taking care of myself once and for all as I now had another person relying on me to be the best mum I could be. The hardest thing about being a diabetic mum is the niggling thought that my child could also develop the disease like me. I get terribly paranoid and often prick her finger in her sleep.   

  

Crystal

Being a mom with diabetes had made me realize that not only do I need to stay healthy for myself but also my child who depends on me to take care of her. It’s gets stressful especially when your suffering from a high or low blood sugar and trying to take care of a little one at the same time and you get frustrated because you don’t feel good but at the end of the day you have that cute little face and slobbery kisses reminding you that it’s all gonna be okay and to stay strong. Some women don’t think they can do it. I know I didn’t but trust me you can and the outcome is definitely worth it!

 

Michele

Being a diabetic mom has made me…..stronger! I have been a Type 1 Diabetic since my son was 6 months and he is now 9…I also have a 4-year-old daughter. I am so blessed to have children who love me and watch out for me with my diabetes. They are trained on when I am high and when I am low…I have a Dexcom so they hear it go off and ask me if I am ok and if I need something. It has made me appreciate my family so much more because they care and do whatever they need to do for me. I have learned even though I am the only one with diabetes that it affects my family just as much as it does me. Some days are amazing…no issues…no highs or lows..great energy….and then there are the bad days…Where I’m unable to get the sugars to act right…moody…tired…but then I know I have to fight through those days to get to the great days ahead of me with my family!!! I HAVE DIABETES IT DOES NOT HAVE ME!!   

 

Melissa

I think life as a diabetic Mom can be messy and unpredictable. The daily focus on T1D has shifted to taking care of another tiny human being. Both are so very important and seem to take over my world. Decisions often need to be made quick for both and without hesitation. Do I need to set my crying baby down while I treat a low or try to bring him with me in my arms while I can barely focus on unwrapping my fruit snacks. Do I need to leave Mommy and Me Yoga early while I am talking to a new Mom friend to grab a spare snack in my car? It has enabled me to become more aware, more empathetic, more cautious, and more scared. It has also taught me to live in the moment and really savor the small seconds with my son.

Beth

Being a mother is hard. Being a diabetic mom adds a level of complexity and stress that few other moms deal with on a daily basis. As a mother, with diabetes, of two children under the age of 3, I have learned a few things. I’ve learned that the adage of making sure you take care of yourself before you take care of your kids is important. Especially when your blood sugar is bottoming out, you’ve got two cranky & hungry kids clamoring for your attention and you don’t have enough brain power to parent, let alone treat the low sugar without going overboard and stuffing your face with half the pantry. Being diabetic & a parent has given me a darn good reason or two to take care of myself as best as I can so that those first & special moments my children will have as they grow up I will be able to enjoy them with my children and not observing from afar because it’s time for my dialysis treatment due to not taking care of myself as best as possible.

      

Jenni

Being a mother with diabetes has its highs and lows for sure. My daughter’s spunk, positive attitude, and kindness are worth all the struggles that come with battling a high blood sugar and just wanting to be alone or having to chug a juice box (or two) because we are in the middle of playing baby house. It’s not always easy but in the end, it’s always worth it!

   

Osob

Motherhood has its ups and downs and when combined with diabetes, the ups and downs come with a lot of highs and lows. I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at 2 years old, I am now 31 with two daughters both under the age of 5. I love being a mother but the hardest thing for me as a diabetic mum has to be the loneliness. It’s just me and the girls most days, the same chores and the same worries day in day out. Am I good enough for them? Are they missing out because of me being diabetic? What if I hypo? Who will help my girls? Diabetes is a lonely disease in its own right and having children has made me even more lonely. People tend to forget about you, the kids and the extra struggles you might be dealing with. I overcome this loneliness because my daughters need me. I love hearing their laughter, I enjoy the enormous smiles on their faces when they do something new. The innocence that I witness on a daily basis makes me feel appreciative to have them in my life. I can’t forget the hugs, kisses, and support that my daughter shows me when I am hypo. She gets me something to drink and is always aware of where my supplies are. Diabetes has made me a strong, independent mother. I plan in advance, make sure my daughters have a routine and in turn, this has made all of us happy and content. I’ve learnt that I am strong enough to carry children, to ignore the restrictions that people put on me and that at times, I need support and encouragement from family, friends, and professionals. My future is bright, even though I have type 1 diabetes, my children will be limitless to achieve whatever their hearts desires.

   

Karly

I have had diabetes for 15 years, I have one son, he just turned 2. Being a diabetic mom is an amazing challenge. Having diabetes has helped me to be a patient mother, a mother who knows that life is precious. Without my son, I can’t say how much longer I would’ve survived, but he saved me. He is why I test!

 

***Thank you to all the amazing ladies from the diabetes community for sharing their story*** 


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