Tag: t1d mom

We Are Not Letting Diabetes Win Anymore

We Are Not Letting Diabetes Win Anymore

We Are Not Letting Diabetes Win Anymore

By: Jodi Otis

10 years ago our lives were forever changed when my then 6-year-old son, Bailey, was diagnosed as a Type 1 Diabetic. I will never forget the day his beautiful brown eyes looked at me as he uttered the words….”Mom, am I going to die?

I swear my heart stopped for that moment in time. I saw his life flash before me in just a matter of seconds. The tears softly rolled down my cheeks as I promised him he was going to be OK, that no matter what, he was going to feel better soon.

Before we knew it we were off to Children’s Hospital where his blood sugar was almost 800 and he had large ketones but was not in DKA. We spent the night and as many T1D parents do—you admire them as they sleep. As I sat in the darkness and silence the tears fell like rain.

And I prayed—I prayed for him to find peace and the strength to handle this. He was six, 6. He should be worrying about if he was going to jump in mud puddles or ride his bike not what his blood sugar is. I knew we had a long road ahead of us.

The next two days we had training so we could take our child home with us and be experts in diabetes. I should have known he would have had the most amazing courage, he took the poker and meter from the nurse and tested his sugar all by himself. He really has no fear of anything!

4 years later, when he was just 10, his 14-year-old sister, Bree, wasn’t feeling well and he could see the telltale signs and he told her to take his meter and check her sugar and if my heart did not stop again….her blood sugar was almost 300.

I couldn’t help but feel anger—not towards her but for her. Anger that she will have to struggle for the rest of her life after seeing him go into DKA twice and be hospitalized. After seeing him have high blood sugars and low blood sugars and feel awful. After seeing him get sick with the slightest cold or virus sometimes. Seeing him have to adjust….EVERY…SINGLE… THING…HE…DOES….TO ….SURVIVE.

I knew she would have a hard time, she is such a picky eater and not a good sleeper, meaning she can sleep for 12 hours at a time, crazy teenagers! She went through a period of depression and I felt her slipping through my fingers and she used her diabetes as a weapon.

I was heartbroken and angry for so long, I felt like diabetes had won, it had taken over my family and my life. Until we decided that we are not just surviving anymore. We are not going to let diabetes win anymore. She had to find the courage to come out on the other side of depression, not an easy thing to do.

Bree has an amazing spirit. Her smile lights up the world. Bailey has the strength of a million men. His courage is far beyond words. Both Bree and Bailey have raced Motocross for several years. It is mentally and physically demanding. Diabetes could have robbed them from a sport they love but they never gave in or gave up. They are my heroes, they are my true warriors. We choose how we live each day, you, me, we choose. Not the disease.

Every day that we fight, we win.


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mom with type 1 diabetes

What Life is Like Being a Mom With Type 1 Diabetes

What Life is Like Being a Mom With Type 1 Diabetes

Just like diabetes—motherhood is a lot of work.

Both are full-time jobs.

Not one is more important than the other.

For me— being a mom with Type 1 Diabetes, they both go hand in hand.

I get asked often ‘how do you manage?’ The kids—they mean.

Of course, that’s only half of the equation in my life.

Not many people realize the other half.

The half that I have to continuously battle every day.

Nobody understands how complex and intertwined diabetes is in every aspect of my life.

It’s certainly made me the strong mother that I am today.

But it’s also made me unlike other mothers as well.

I’m the mother who pricks her finger several times a day, and those numbers determining whether it’s safe to attend to my children.

The one who packs for an army to leave the house for a quick errand—but never being fully prepared enough.

The mother who has to take breaks constantly and has to eat the snack that my child wants desperately. Knowing that sometimes I have to come first.

The one who has to go to as many doctor appointments—if not more than my children.

I’m the mother who wants to vent to an open ear but doesn’t think they would understand.

The mother trying to lose weight, only to have a difficult time due to having to treat lows.

I’m one who carries guilt, wanting to be the best mother and not wanting diabetes to inhibit that in any way.

Having to steal a part of my children’s innocence by teaching them about this disease that I wish I could keep from them.

I’m the mother who worries about going to sleep at night—fearing of not waking up in the morning.

Waking up some days feeling like I’ve been run over by a truck and just continuing to push through.

The mother who is constantly attached to devices, and always setting off alarms.

The one with erratic mood swings, an inconsistent schedule, and a low blood sugar peaking around the corner.

I’m the mother who carries around the weight of this disease on her shoulders every day.

Trying to care for others while having to care for myself first.

The one who worries every minute of every day—wondering if I’m doing this right.

I’m the mother who is concerned about the short term implications of this disease and having to accept the long-term effects that correlate.

The mother who works so hard every day at this disease so that I can see my grandchildren one day.

I may have diabetes—but diabetes doesn’t have me. Diabetes has given me the tools to fight. But being a mother has given me the reason to fight. 

Being a mom with Type 1 Diabetes—my life may not be ordinary, easy, or simple.

I may have my bad days, my setbacks, and my doubts.

But I go on despite them.