Tag: mother

What I’ve Learned From My Child Who Battles Type 1 Diabetes

By: Kirsten White


I learned how to be brave.
I learned how to stay strong.
I learned how to stare fear in the face with a giggle and a smile.
I learned what life is all about.
I learned what a hero really is.
I learned what a fighter does.
I learned what courage feels like.
I learned what unstoppable means.

I am the mother, I am supposed to teach my son these things.

But this T1D life has brought a new perspective. The long sleepless nights. The math skills I never knew I possessed. The gut wrenching fear of highs and lows, pertaining to both blood glucose readings and the events of the day.

The planning. The prescriptions. The doctors appointments. The technology. The sticks and pokes, and new things to carry on his body. He has faced them all with a smile.

Even on our three day stay in the hospital at diagnosis, he was running and playing with a smile, and singing, his favorite country stars songs, Jamey Johnson to everyone. He was the talk of the hospital wing.

He shows off his gear with pride now everywhere we go. He gets excited to see kids wearing gear like his at all the events we attend to raise money and awareness. He hasn’t let a thing stop him. He even shows off his Tae Kwon Do skills wearing his gear to win his first trophy.

I want him to always have such a bright and happy outlook on life. To grow and learn about his disease and to educate others. I pray nothing in this life will ever put a damper on those big blue eyes, and those dimples.

Yes, my three year old has been the tough one, the strong one, the brave one.

He has taught my family how life should be faced no matter what is thrown at you. He is my hero, better than Batman. For the rest of my life I will fight along side him until there is a cure! 



 

Raising a teen with type 1 diabetes

Raising a Teen With Type 1 Diabetes

Raising a Teen With Type 1 Diabetes

Raising Ezra, Our T1D

By: Christie Meyers

Who knew that day at the pediatrician, we would be admitted to the hospital a few hours later.

My little boy, 5 years old, bravely getting insulin injections and checking blood sugars fearlessly. He said to his Endo, “okay I eat, my mom gives me a shot and I check my blood sugars. Can I go home now? My sisters miss me”. I was amazed as his ability to accept this new way of life. I thought “we’ve got this!”.

That continued for quite some time. Ezra, my “z man” as we call him, took diabetes head on. He began using an insulin pump at age 6. This allowed for more freedom as he went to play dates and played sports. I could administer a bolus by his meter and he wasn’t interrupted.

We both were feeling so confident; so optimistic.

I read about complications and about kids and adults with Type 1 diabetes refusing to care for themselves. I thought “thank God he is responsible. We’ll never have that problem”.


Now we’re here.

Age 12. Puberty. Entering the teen years. And it’s been a rough two years. He eats and doesn’t bolus. He lies about blood sugars. He doesn’t want to carry his meter when he goes outside. Ezra is tired of having diabetes.

He’s embarrassed of always having supplies with him. He’s overwhelmed by the process and never ending responsibility. And I now think, who can blame him? I’m his mother. I don’t have diabetes. And I hate it. The worrying. The midnight checks. The extra prep that goes into everyday. Counting every carb he eats. Measuring food. Packing supplies.

Watching him go through something that I can’t take away from him. I tell him to be positive. That it’s not a choice he has to neglect his health. But ultimately it is his choice. He’s growing up. I can’t be everywhere and I can’t make all his choices.

I believe in him.

I believe he’s going to be okay. He’s going to find a way to find his focus and to be successful mentally, physically and emotionally. What I see is diabetes affects so much more than the physical. And I’m so proud of my son for being who he is and being able to talk to me about how he feels.

It’s been almost 7 years since our lives completely changed. My Zman is my hero. He’s my little lion. Fearless and brave. And diabetes will not beat him down. He’s going to conquer before it has the chance.



mothers of type 1 diabetics

To the Mothers of Type 1 Diabetics

To the Mothers of Type 1 Diabetics – (A Mother’s Day Post)

It’s often that we hear how heroic people with Type 1 Diabetes are, but it’s not very often that we give thanks to the ones behind the scenes that help us get to where we are today—which include the t1d mothers and fathers.

“This disease takes a team of people to manage it, and when it all seems to be falling apart around us, it’s thanks to you for holding us together.”

We couldn’t do it without the people who love and support us.

So this is for all the mothers of type 1 diabetics:

Thank you-

To all the mothers who’s hearts were shattered into pieces the day you heard the news of diagnosis but told us everything was going to be okay. The mothers who have found and continue to find the strength every day to fight this disease along with us—especially on the days we feel weak. The ones who get up throughout the night and instinctively check our blood sugars to make sure we make it through to the morning.

Mothers who advocate for us and give all of us a voice in this world. The mothers who get up every day exhausted and take on whatever the day brings, just hoping that our day is a little better than the last. The ones who encourage us to reach for the stars and never let diabetes stand in our way.

Mothers that are always checking up on us and letting us know that you care.

The mothers who have to be prepared at all times on how to handle life threatening situations if and when they occur. The one’s who try to stay as calm as possible during difficult moments when deep down you’re breaking.

Mothers who have to fight tooth and nail for authorizations and approvals through insurances; for—prescriptions, doctor visits, medical devices, and insulin. The ones who have to fight back tears when administering insulin, knowing that it’s the only thing keeping us alive. The mothers who always have to plan everything ahead of time. Whether it be our meals, snacks, emergency essentials, making sure insulin dosages, sensor changes, and the list goes on.

Mothers who carry guilt from not knowing if you’re doing a good job – (but believe me you’re doing amazing).

The mothers who are carrying the weight of the world on their shoulders; Day in and day out, 24/7, 365 days a year. Whether you’re new to this disease or you’ve been helping manage a type 1 diabetic for many years; what you all have in common is that you are all heroes. You are trying with everything you have at a disease that ultimately cannot be controlled.

You were unexpectedly handed a difficult challenge because you are STRONG enough to endure it. And you rise to the occasion every day without hesitation. There’s really nothing more you can ask for.

Thank you to all the mothers of type 1 diabetics from the bottom of my heart! You are all appreciated more than you know.

 

Sincerely,
A Type 1 Diabetic


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Motherhood and Diabetes – Not All Superheroes Wear Capes

Motherhood and Diabetes

Becoming a mother has changed all our lives. We appreciate each day more than before. Every hug, every kiss, every “I love you mom“. Even though we make it look easy, it’s a constant struggle. We fight to be here, we fight for our health, for our future, and most importantly for our babies. Not a moment is taken for granted.

 

Not all superheroes wear capes. We often wear spit up, food, blood, tears, sweat, and even an insulin pump. 

 

There’s never a dull moment being a diabetic mother. With all the difficulties that motherhood brings, we face diabetes on top of it all. But we continue to set the bar high, to do better, to challenge ourselves, and make our children proud.

 

They keep us going after all. Our children are our saviors, and we are blessed to be their mothers.

***

Happy Mothers Day

To the whole diabetes community for your strength, courage, and perseverance (you are all true diabetic superheroes).

Amanda

Being a type 1 Diabetic mom has made me realize how tough it is to raise a child that has diabetes…my poor mom and what I put her through….I only hope my daughters will not get diagnosed with it, but it is a worry that I have every day of my life…on the other hand, it never lets me forget how precious every minute of the day is and how much more I want to be in control of my sugars for the sake of my two daughters…I want to see them grow up, and they deserve to have a happy, healthy, mommy!

 

Katharine (Kathy)

Motherhood and diabetes has made me realize just how much of a miracle my son is and how much you can accomplish no matter what cards you have been dealt. On August 16, 2007, I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, just 2 months before getting married at the age of 26. I thought I would never forget that day because of my life changing diagnosis. For the following 5 anniversaries, I pondered on my new life while remembering with grief the life I lost. But on my 6th anniversary of diagnosis, my son was born. August 16th became the best day of my life instead of the worst. I had a rough pregnancy and even harder birth experience. And learning to care for a newborn while managing this disease was something I didn’t think I would find strength for. But then I realized my reason to go on, my reason for fighting this disease every day, was right in front of me. My son is now the reason I push through on the hard days. I do it for him. And I am thankful he gave me a reason to celebrate August 16th instead of mourning it. I am a diabetic mommy. And I am stronger person because of it.

  

Becky

Becoming a mom made me realize that I had to focus & start taking care of myself once and for all as I now had another person relying on me to be the best mum I could be. The hardest thing about being a diabetic mum is the niggling thought that my child could also develop the disease like me. I get terribly paranoid and often prick her finger in her sleep.   

  

Crystal

Being a mom with diabetes had made me realize that not only do I need to stay healthy for myself but also my child who depends on me to take care of her. It’s gets stressful especially when your suffering from a high or low blood sugar and trying to take care of a little one at the same time and you get frustrated because you don’t feel good but at the end of the day you have that cute little face and slobbery kisses reminding you that it’s all gonna be okay and to stay strong. Some women don’t think they can do it. I know I didn’t but trust me you can and the outcome is definitely worth it!

 

Michele

Being a diabetic mom has made me…..stronger! I have been a Type 1 Diabetic since my son was 6 months and he is now 9…I also have a 4-year-old daughter. I am so blessed to have children who love me and watch out for me with my diabetes. They are trained on when I am high and when I am low…I have a Dexcom so they hear it go off and ask me if I am ok and if I need something. It has made me appreciate my family so much more because they care and do whatever they need to do for me. I have learned even though I am the only one with diabetes that it affects my family just as much as it does me. Some days are amazing…no issues…no highs or lows..great energy….and then there are the bad days…Where I’m unable to get the sugars to act right…moody…tired…but then I know I have to fight through those days to get to the great days ahead of me with my family!!! I HAVE DIABETES IT DOES NOT HAVE ME!!   

 

Melissa

I think life as a diabetic Mom can be messy and unpredictable. The daily focus on T1D has shifted to taking care of another tiny human being. Both are so very important and seem to take over my world. Decisions often need to be made quick for both and without hesitation. Do I need to set my crying baby down while I treat a low or try to bring him with me in my arms while I can barely focus on unwrapping my fruit snacks. Do I need to leave Mommy and Me Yoga early while I am talking to a new Mom friend to grab a spare snack in my car? It has enabled me to become more aware, more empathetic, more cautious, and more scared. It has also taught me to live in the moment and really savor the small seconds with my son.

Beth

Being a mother is hard. Being a diabetic mom adds a level of complexity and stress that few other moms deal with on a daily basis. As a mother, with diabetes, of two children under the age of 3, I have learned a few things. I’ve learned that the adage of making sure you take care of yourself before you take care of your kids is important. Especially when your blood sugar is bottoming out, you’ve got two cranky & hungry kids clamoring for your attention and you don’t have enough brain power to parent, let alone treat the low sugar without going overboard and stuffing your face with half the pantry. Being diabetic & a parent has given me a darn good reason or two to take care of myself as best as I can so that those first & special moments my children will have as they grow up I will be able to enjoy them with my children and not observing from afar because it’s time for my dialysis treatment due to not taking care of myself as best as possible.

      

Jenni

Being a mother with diabetes has its highs and lows for sure. My daughter’s spunk, positive attitude, and kindness are worth all the struggles that come with battling a high blood sugar and just wanting to be alone or having to chug a juice box (or two) because we are in the middle of playing baby house. It’s not always easy but in the end, it’s always worth it!

   

Osob

Motherhood has its ups and downs and when combined with diabetes, the ups and downs come with a lot of highs and lows. I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at 2 years old, I am now 31 with two daughters both under the age of 5. I love being a mother but the hardest thing for me as a diabetic mum has to be the loneliness. It’s just me and the girls most days, the same chores and the same worries day in day out. Am I good enough for them? Are they missing out because of me being diabetic? What if I hypo? Who will help my girls? Diabetes is a lonely disease in its own right and having children has made me even more lonely. People tend to forget about you, the kids and the extra struggles you might be dealing with. I overcome this loneliness because my daughters need me. I love hearing their laughter, I enjoy the enormous smiles on their faces when they do something new. The innocence that I witness on a daily basis makes me feel appreciative to have them in my life. I can’t forget the hugs, kisses, and support that my daughter shows me when I am hypo. She gets me something to drink and is always aware of where my supplies are. Diabetes has made me a strong, independent mother. I plan in advance, make sure my daughters have a routine and in turn, this has made all of us happy and content. I’ve learnt that I am strong enough to carry children, to ignore the restrictions that people put on me and that at times, I need support and encouragement from family, friends, and professionals. My future is bright, even though I have type 1 diabetes, my children will be limitless to achieve whatever their hearts desires.

   

Karly

I have had diabetes for 15 years, I have one son, he just turned 2. Being a diabetic mom is an amazing challenge. Having diabetes has helped me to be a patient mother, a mother who knows that life is precious. Without my son, I can’t say how much longer I would’ve survived, but he saved me. He is why I test!

 

***Thank you to all the amazing ladies from the diabetes community for sharing their story*** 


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