Category: Inspiration

good life

Our Own Rhythms to a Good Life

Our Own Rhythms to a Good Life

So, as a type 1 diabetic, I have blood work drawn every 6 months. This time around, the one test for overall blood sugar control, HbA1C, was up to 7.8. This ain’t a great number. In fact, it’s higher than it’s been in 5 years- higher than when I weighed enough to be classified as almost obese.

Why am I telling you this? To me, it’s a reminder of a few things.

You can’t take anything at face value.

Anyone that sees me on the street today will probably not make a note of it. I’m pretty generic looking. Average height and average weight- I’m an average looking mom of 2 boys. I exercise regularly. I write down what foods I eat and try to stick to a balanced diet.

No one can see I have a condition that I fight every day. There are no outward signs, unless someone sees me test or inject insulin, that I have to monitor what I eat, what I do and inject medicine every few hours of every single day.

There are tons of people out there like me. We all have things going on that others don’t have a clue about. It’s a reminder to pass on a smile every chance we get. It’s something we can do to lighten whatever burden the other person may be carrying.

You can always do better.

I look healthy and I feel fantastic. I went through some stuff in my early 40s that made me afraid I would be in pain for the rest of my life. I worked hard and improved. Despite my apparent health now, I’m reminded by this blood work that I can still do better.

Diabetic Warriors (my favorite term) can get numb to the daily grind and we need to be reminded to pick up our game. This doesn’t apply to just us Warriors, though. We all need reminders.

We all need new inspiration to keep our goals in sight.

A corollary to the fact we can do better is our need to get help from others to do so. For me, I should reach out to my health care team to help me gain tighter control of my diabetes. This goes for everyone: getting help from others helps us succeed. It can make the process more enjoyable, as well.

Enjoy your days.

I could get depressed about my numbers or ticked that I have this stupid condition in the first place. I choose not to, though. I choose to find ways I can enjoy getting and staying in shape. I choose to spend time each day doing things and being with people who fill me with joy and purpose.

I’m not rich with money but I am rich with the satisfaction of who and what I am.

To me, that’s a very good life.


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challenge accepted

Challenge Accepted –

Challenge accepted –

By: Ryan Baldwin


December 18, 1992..I was nine years old and I had been pretty sick for 3 months. My mother had taken me in for another doctor visit..only this time, I wasn’t going home right after. Instead, I was being admitted to the hospital. I remember asking my mom, “why are all these tubes hooked to me? What is diabetes? And when do I get to go home??”

I knew diabetes was serious when my mom and dad coexisted in the same room for 6 days..soaking up as much as they could about a disease neither side of my family knew anything about. “You can leave when you can give yourself your own shot.” Deathly afraid of needles, I knew the last place I wanted to be on Christmas was the hospital. Two hours later, my mother and I were on our way home.

For the last 25 years, I couldn’t tell you how many times I’ve heard “Ryan you can’t…”

This disease I live with isn’t a death sentence….. I choose to look at diabetes as a challenge. Life’s way of testing my limits. An opportunity. We all have our own challenges. Mine just happens to involve many calculations and perhaps carrying around more items each time I go out.

“Ryan you can’t…”

I can. I’ve been able to race cars, play hockey & football, surf, enjoy the outdoors. I can go to Vegas with the guys. Of course we face challenges along the way. But, who doesn’t?

Over time, my challenges have evolved from showing I can and fitting in.

My 10 year old son came home from school. So excited. “Dad..there’s a kid in my class. He’s just like you!!”

Now, Im faced with a new challenge. A new opportunity to show my kids that everyone has their own struggles. Everyone has issues. Yet we are all the same.

Highs. Lows. Sleepless nights. Mood swings. Fatigue. The curious stares as you inject while out at dinner. The awkward noises coming from your CGM while out in public or in a meeting. No biggie. It’s not a crutch. It’s a challenge. To better yourself. To rise and conquer.

I embrace the challenges ahead. To advocate and educate on type 1 diabetes. We aren’t alone. I’m reminded everyday. Whether it’s getting a text/call from a buddy because he got an alert regarding my sugar levels. Or my children stopping in their tracks to make sure Dad is ok because he’s acting funny or they heard the all familiar alert coming from my CGM.

Diabetes is what you make it. Don’t let it control you.


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A Positive Outlook Leads To a Positive Outcome

A Positive Outlook Leads To a Positive Outcome

Anita Brown

http://anitanicolebrown.com/


My name is Anita Nicole Brown and I am an 18 year Type 1 DiaBadAss! On November 12th, 2017 I will be celebrating 19 years with this disease and I will be celebrating!

I want to change the perspective of what it means to be a Type 1 Diabetic!

So how do I plan on doing that? By celebrating everything I have learned since being diagnosed with T1D and by bringing attention to this disease so that others can see the strength we actually have!

So my story is simple:

I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes on November 12th, 1998 (my father’s birthday and an A1C of 28)! Shortly after, I was also diagnosed with diabetic nerve damage in my legs and feet that cost me the ability to walk for about a year!

Now, this was in no way caused by me or how I was taking care of myself. It was later determined that my diabetes should have been discovered in 8th grade. However, it was not diagnosed until my senior year of high school! And because it went so long without treatment, the nerve damage set in.

As you can guess, it was a difficult time! I mean it was my senior year of high school! A time I was to be excited about prom, homecoming, graduation and college! Instead I spent most of my senior year either at home or in the hospital! And I was so afraid that because of this disease, I would not graduate!

But, I do believe I am a bit too stubborn for that to have been the end of my story! See, when my doctors told me it was a possibility that the nerve damage would never go away and I may see permanent damage….. I was not in agreement!

So I kept fighting.

Kept working at getting my levels in order and learning as much as I could about this new disease. And one morning I woke and my nerve damage had gone away! I do not think I can express the feeling of being able to walk, run, dance without help or assistance or pain!

And to graduate 2nd in my class after all that! But that was not the end of this battle with T1D! There was more to come that (at 18) I could not have been prepared for! You see, I also found myself dealing with many failed pregnancies and even a thyroid problem and even more!

It got to the point that I felt that life was not worth living if this was going to be my life! And I did try to end it all. I did throw in the towel! I remember when I came to this decision and I told God (or whatever power above you believe in) that I could not continue. That it was too hard.

But, I also told Him that if I woke the next morning….. I would know I had a purpose. A reason for being. As you can see I did wake the next morning. And I woke with perfect glucose levels! As I saw this I looked up to God and said: “Message received….. Just tell me what You have in store for me!”

From that moment, I knew I was stronger than I had given myself credit for.I knew I was given this disease because I could handle it. I can learn from it and I can grow! And that has been my mission!

I know how hard it is to have this disease. To constantly have to count carbs, make insulin adjustments, keep up with doctor’s appointments and pay attention to what my body is telling me! It is a JOB! But I now confront it with a positivity I did not have in the beginning!

Instead of being angry or upset, I look to find the positive!

And the biggest positive is the fact that I woke up this morning when so many did not! This tells me I have more to do! That my reason for being has not been fulfilled!

So I decided to go even further! I mean why not be a T1D Actress, Model, Action Fighter? I mean who says we can’t do these things and still be upfront about our disease? Still keep people informed! Still spread awareness? When I was 17 and trying to find someone….. ANYONE I could look to, I had NO ONE!

I am the only type 1 in my family so when I was learning and dealing with this….. I felt so alone! Now, I know I am not alone and I love the strength this T1D community has! I want to show the good and the bad with being a type 1 diabetic. And I hope that by showing both sides, the good is what can be seen and looked up to more!

We are so much stronger than we know and give ourselves credit for! We were given this task of balancing our lives around this disease and making it look….. easy even when it is not! But I know we were selected because we have that power….. we ARE that power!

We may never be “normal” and that is a beautiful thing! No one who has ever accomplished anything was considered “normal”! So let’s let be loud….. Let’s be vocal and show this world how DiaBadAss we truly are! We have the power to tell our story…… So let’s tell it!



 

silver lining of chronic illness

The Silver Lining of Chronic Illness – Something Good That Can Be Found In a Bad Situation

Silver Lining Of Chronic Illness – Something Good That Can Be Found In a Bad Situation

By: Kylie Whitten


3 years ago I was a happy, healthy, carefree 20 year old. Fast forward three years, and I’m a happy, (somewhat) healthy, (somewhat) carefree 23 year old, who just happens to have type one diabetes. I don’t think it ever crosses anyone’s mind that one day you will get sick and never get better. It happens though.

At first I was going to write about all the bad parts of type one diabetes (because let’s face it there is a lot). I was going to write about what it took from me and how hard it has been on me.

But I’m not.

I refuse to let this chronic illness take anything else from me, including my happiness. So instead I’m going to focus on the silver linings of type one diabetes.

Becoming chronically ill changes you.

Your life turns around, and you suddenly don’t know left from right. Life becomes messy (as if it wasn’t already messy enough), and hard to navigate. But life also becomes more clearer.

You take advantage of the good days, because sometimes they are few and far between, and you learn to not sweat the bad. If I didn’t appreciate things enough before diabetes, I promise you I do now.

Diabetes has made me a stronger person. I know what I’m capable of now, & I don’t let anything stop me. I know what I want out of life, & nothing will get in my way of that. Not even diabetes.

Not everything about diabetes is unfortunate. I have bad days but I’m constantly reminded that the good outweighs the bad. I’ve truly found myself these last three years. I’ve loved a lot harder, and learned that surrounding yourself with people that get and stick around when life gets messy, is good for your soul.

I understand now that something I can’t control will not control my happiness. There is always a silver lining, you just have to find it. Even if it takes you awhile.



 

This Is My Life Support, This Is Type 1 Diabetes

This Is My Life Support, This Is Type 1 Diabetes

By: Katharine Orona

Instagram: @this_is_type_1_diabetes | Blog: thisistype1diabetes


10 years ago I was only a few weeks away from having my life turned upside down and changed forever. I was only weeks away from being diagnosed with an incurable disease, one I didn’t bring upon myself, and one I knew nothing about.

I was about to be diagnosed with Type 1 (LADA) Diabetes.

I had been the picture of health. Perfect blood work results at every checkup, thin, and young. I was 26 years old, about to get married, and recently promoted at work. It was then that I thought I had everything under control and everything seemed to be perfect.

I had all the classic symptoms but didn’t know what they meant: extreme thirst, frequent urination, and rapid unexplained weight loss (at 5 feet tall, I went from 106 lbs to 90 lbs in less than 3 months). My doctor knew right away it was diabetes when I went in with my symptoms. I went to the ER, was immediately admitted, and spent 5 days at the hospital.

After that it took me 5 years to come to terms with my disease.

5 years to go through anger, denial, and grief over losing a life I had known for 26 years. 5 years to decide I was ready to start using a different form of treatment, an insulin pump.

I was so resistant to this technology. I saw it as life support, I saw it as a restriction, I saw it as something I would have to conceal and be ashamed about. When I was finally ready and took the plunge, I loved it from day one. To my surprise, it was freeing, not restricting.

life support

It is life support, but I am thankful for it.

However, I still felt the need to conceal it. I dreaded being asked questions about it or having people wonder why I was wearing a pager (90s folks you know what that is). I felt embarrassed that I needed something to live that other people did not. It took a long time to own it.

A few years later when I was pregnant with my son and my doctor suggested a continuous glucose monitor I went through the same feelings all over again. Another medical device? More things that will make it harder for me to pick an outfit that can conceal that too? But, I knew I had to do it so I did.

My son was worth every awkward stare and every question I faced.

These are tools that I use to make my life a tiny bit more normal. They keep me alive. When my son was born 5 weeks before his due date, and I later made the connection, I realized that he was born on the 6th anniversary of my diabetes diagnosis, at the same hospital I spent those first 5 days after diagnosis.

That fateful day in 2007 that I thought was the worst day of my life, turned out to be the best day of my life 6 years later.

Today I can finally say I not only wear my medical devices with pride, I rock them.

And no matter what method of treatment you choose, know that it’s keeping you alive and you are stronger because of it. Feel comfortable with whatever makes you different. Because it makes you YOU.

As Dr Seuss once said: “Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.”


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dear diabetes

Dear Diabetes –

Dear Diabetes –

Photo Credit: David Marcu


Dear Diabetes,

The monster, the nightmare, the thing I never wanted to meet.

Here we are.

Here I am—standing stronger than ever.

Alive, thriving, living beside you.

Day after day.

I’ll admit, I didn’t know that I had it in me.

I didn’t know if I could make it this far.

But you pulled strength out from within me that I didn’t know existed.

You made me who I am today.

Through all the darkness has come light.

I hate you.

I hate something that I can’t put a face on.

I hate that nobody knows how bad this disease really is.

I hate that I can’t fight you off, you won’t go away.

Why me?

I used to ask myself this very question.

What did I do to deserve this?

I’ve been nearly close to death and somehow I’m still here.

You haven’t left me alone, not once.

But even after enduring all the battle scars—I just keep getting right back up, brushing myself off, and keep going.

There’s never been another choice.

The time I’ve spent with you feels like a test.

It’s a fight that’s never ending.

One minute I think I’ve figured you out, and the next I’m completely lost.

I don’t feel like I’m winning but I can’t tell if I’m losing either.

You’ve challenged me to take control and face my worst fears.

You’ve pushed me to the point of breaking, but I never surrender.

I always persevere with whatever strength I have left in me.

I used to be afraid of your capabilities, the unknown, and of all the things I can’t control.

But I’m not afraid.

Dear Diabetes

You don’t have control over me.

This is my life and I’m going to live it.

Even if that means that I have to dance in the rain.

Sincerely,

Me



 

Diabetes, You Have Not Won

Diabetes, You Have Not Won –

Diabetes, You Have Not Won

Dear Diabetes,

You came into my life almost 2 years ago without much warning. In case you’ve forgotten, I was only 19 years old when you came in and tried to mess things up. I was in the middle of my second year of college and I was a very good student, I was eating well, I was exercising, and I seemed to be the picture of health.

Slowly, my energy began to fade, I wasn’t feeling myself, and I was literally wasting away to nothing. I soon would learn that I had YOU inside of me and there was nothing I could do to get rid of you.

You have stole my freedom and every bit of youth and innocence I had left. You have taken away hundreds of hours of sleep. You have scarred my small body. You have ruined my once perfect fingerprints. You have made mealtimes a hassle.

You have made people distance themselves from me. You have given me a label that most people do not fully understand. You have made me shed more tears in the past 2 years than I had in my entire life. You challenged my family financially and emotionally.

BUT, you have not won.

Little do you know, you’ve helped shape me into who I am today. You made me brave. You made me health conscious. You gave me empathy. You made me mature. You connected me with some of my best friends.

You gave me new opportunities. You made me an overcomer. You strengthened my faith in the Lord. You gave me a cause to fight for. You have shaped me into a strong young woman who doesn’t let anything in life get her down.

After all, if I can fight you every day and still stand tall, what can’t I do? So, to you, I say thank you. Sorry you couldn’t totally ruin my life like you might have intended, I’m still standing tall and I won’t back down.

-Ashlyn


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Perfection Does Not Exist In a Life With Diabetes

Perfection Does Not Exist With Diabetes –

Perfection Does Not Exist With Diabetes –

By: Christina Blackmon

15 years ago my life changed forever when I was told I had Type 1 diabetes.

I didn’t even know what diabetes was. I think I thought it meant you can’t eat sugar anymore. Little did I know that when I turned 20 years old my pancreas unexplainably stopped working properly and that would mean that my entire life would now depend on a hormone called insulin being injected into my body for the rest of my life.

Without those insulin injections I would die.

Little did I know that for the rest of my life I would be completely dependent upon this hormone. I also had no idea that my days thereafter would consist of being measured 8-10 times per day by a number. A number I get from pricking myself. Knowing that important number so that I can mathematically calculate how much insulin to inject to maintain good blood glucose range based on a formula that changes hourly without notice.

I also had no idea how unpredictable and unreliable my body would be and that there would be factors outside my control that dictated what my blood glucose levels would be despite eating and calculating “correctly”.

That my blood glucose would go up and down like a roller coaster ride and effect every fiber of my being. That sometimes I would want to crawl out of my own skin to escape the pain I was enduring. That I would go from being completely calm and rational to completely angry and irritable. That my pain would be invisible to others because it’s all happening internally without notice to anyone else.

There is no exact science or prescription to manage diabetes and everyday is a guessing game. Knowledge became my power and I studied and researched everything I could about this unforgivable disease. I found that it’s high maintenance and takes no breaks or vacations.

But I also found some tools that would help me. Tools like an insulin pump and continuous glucose monitor that could help me manage every second, every minute, every hour of every day for the rest of my life.

There is no cure for type 1 diabetes. I will always be dependent upon insulin.

Even with my tools – just like every piece of technology they fail me. But despite this disease I have 2 beautiful healthy kids and one on the way and no diabetic complications. Some days I feel so strong like I can do anything then others I lack the motivation to keep going.

But I never give up. I keep fighting and will keep fighting till there’s no fight left in me.

I don’t ever see any other option. I’m very thankful for the tools I have to manage this disease with everything I have and love when I can encourage or inspire other diabetics to do the same.

People ask me all the time is your diabetes controlled and I just want to laugh…what does that even mean??!! I just always say it’s not perfect and will never be. I don’t try to maintain perfection because diabetes means having bad days. I try to have more good than bad days and not focus on perfection.

Perfection does not exist in a life with diabetes.



 

Why Are They Judging Me?

Why Are They Judging Me?

Why Are They Judging Me?

By: Marrium abid Sandhu

Some people have a background or a story that is so central to their identity that they believe their life would be incomplete without it. Here’s my story..

Why are they judging me?

Is this the reality or do I suffer from schizophrenia? I’m not from another galaxy, I mean, I just have diabetes.

Society took it upon itself to delineate me as a diabetic. On the mention of my name, the ignorant minds of humans formed an image of a weak, disoriented, bewildered and egotistical teenager.

I was nine years old when I was first diagnosed with type-one diabetes. It shook me to my core. I was not old enough to even comprehend what diabetes meant. But the way people around me reacted; it felt as if I was an unstable nucleus emitting radiations.

My heart told me to be optimistic, persuaded me to look at life from this new perspective, but everything in my life went downhill. On various occasions during the early stages, I was able to pick myself up and do my daily chores the normal way but that did not last that way for long.

Pricking my fingers four to five times a day and taking insulin shots before every meal was never an easy task. Until high school, I used to go around hiding the fact that I was a diabetic. I had an irrational fear of people judging me. I hardly socialized. I kept to my room and to myself, reading miserable and depressing novels, injecting myself with something that was supposed to make me better but felt no less than a cruel punishment.

As I grew older,

things started to improve and diabetes became a part of my daily routine. I realized that having diabetes was a part of me but it in no way defined me. It had rehabilitated me. It had made me resilient, mentally and morally.

As I progressed through high school, I craved to do better in academics, sports, and life in general. Having diabetes gave me strength to face any challenge or problem that came my way.

Friends are of imminent importance, you cannot function without having someone to talk to, someone to associate yourself with. Socializing made me grasp the significance and need for someone to share my feelings with, someone to trust with my problems.

My family and I shifted a lot due to my father’s work. Being on the go, I constantly met new people who made me confident in my own skin. I went to Greece on a school trip for 4 weeks. Exploring a new country, a completely different environment was an experience I will trade for nothing.

Doing everything myself, from shopping to laundry, I gained a fair bit of poise and familiarized myself with adapting to a new place and a completely different way of life. The diabetic, anthrophobic girl had transformed.

My hard working and astute sense of nature led me to be selected as a part of my school’s student council and in addition I represented my school in various national level sports competitions. I volunteered myself to help the underdeveloped schools in my city.

I taught English and Mathematics to a group of class 9 students. I saw a whole new way of life within my culture in that school. And now I’m studying architecture in one of the best universities in turkey.

I am a diabetic.

And I do not have a problem with people judging me because of that. If they judge me, it does not depict who I am, it depicts who they are.

To sum it up in the words of Sonia Sotomayor, the current associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States,

“Diabetes taught me discipline”.



 

Navigating type 1 diabetes and learning along the way

Navigating Type 1 Diabetes and Learning Along the Way

Navigating Type 1 Diabetes and Learning Along the Way

Monica Westley, PhD

Here is my story about our daughter Allison, and the incredible lessons she has taught us. We have always been a family of explorers and adventurers, readers of books and lovers of nature. We encouraged our kids to learn as much about the world as they could. Still, until four years ago, we like so many others, knew very little about type 1 diabetes.

Allison had been losing weight (but growing taller) thirsty (but it was hot here in SoCal) and then began to have flu symptoms. On the second day of the “flu” (DKA) we brought her to her pediatrician. I asked “Could this be high blood sugar”? The pediatrician said, “Oh its very unlikely but why don’t you go to the ER, we don’t have a way to measure that here!”

At the ER, our daughter was lying down, super sick, yet still we had to ask that she be seen several times. We waited for over 3 hours, along with those who were waiting to be seen for a common cold. Finally, in the back, the young doctor sampled her blood with the glucometer and turned to me. “Your daughter has type 1 diabetes. It’s a life long condition for which there is no cure. You will be taken by ambulance to the Children’s hospital where you will learn how to live with this.” And so began our journey.

Initially, its all a blur. You’re thinking,” Ok I think we can fix this if….”. Then you realize there is no way out of this condition, and you must move forward as a family. You start to learn all you possibly can about it and how to optimize blood sugars. For the first 2 years we checked her every night at 2am, and more if her blood sugar didn’t settle down.

Then came the advent of Nightscout, which was a group of amazing parents who hacked into the existing technology to allow the blood sugars to be visualized by parents. Quickly, Medtronic and Dexcom responded with their own “version” of Nightscout. The ability to see Allison’s blood sugars on our phones by our bedside and to be alarmed if she came out of range was invaluable. Our rattled nerves could settle a bit. Now she could go overnight with friends, and that was a freedom gained!

Then we learned about TYPEONE Grit, a low carb, high protein way of eating (WOE) endorsed by Dr. Richard Bernstein, and followed by many. Google him, he’s amazing. This WOE was not recommended by our pediatric endo or the CDE in the hospital, but it was an amazing and invaluable resource and has helped keep her blood sugars much more stable. Another win!

Finally, after she was experiencing many undiagnosable “Highs” I began to search for an answer. Allison uses the Medtronic pump, and I asked our endo to change her from the plastic cannula in the MIO quickset to the SureT needle. Their feeling was that she didn’t really need it. However, when I pressed they changed it. Almost immediately, she was in better control. Yet another win!

From all these experiences we learned, when your child has Type 1 diabetes, you MUST continually be your child’s advocate, you must be proactive, you must keep searching for new advances and ways of doing things. At times you will be exhausted, sad, maybe on your knees, but don’t lose faith! This disease will unexpectedly teach you many things.

What else did we learn? We learned that Allison has an amazing spirit! At times, diabetes dampened her spirit, but it’s ember has never gone out. Her capacity for resilience, tenacity and resourcefulness has grown stronger with every year.

What has she done since her diagnosis? Allison has been class president, homecoming queen, a runway model for JDRF, raised over $20,000 for JDRF. She has worked in a type 1 diabetes research lab at Harvard, started a Hands on Science program at a local underprivileged school and kept it going every week for 3 years, received the Presidential Service Award, National Honor Society recommended, straight As, Cum Laude Society, Peer Mentor leader, started her company Mermaid Medicine, acted in the school musical, created her column “In Someone Else’s Shoes”.

She was named “19 under 19 to watch” and completed 4 years of high school varsity sports. She currently runs the fastest mile on the track team. Allison has also recently been accepted to USC (Merit Scholar) and to Harvard. Right now she is preparing to go on a 2 week wilderness adventure off the grid in the Sierras where she will be the only person with T1D.

Pretty cool, right?

People say, “She makes it look so easy”. And she does. I do want to tell those on “the outside of diabetes” just don’t forget that behind it 24/7/365 she is walking the tightrope of blood sugars. It requires strength and grit. She is strong and most importantly, she is kind. Because of all she deals with in her own diabetes realm, her compassion muscle is very strong. She even gives those like our current US Budget Director Mick Mulvaney, who think there’s one type of diabetes, and judge those who have it, compassion.

Heres what I would share to the “newbie parents”. Be your child’s advocate. Trust your gut, you are on the front lines of this with your child. Be proactive. Never stop learning about the disease and new technology, clinical trials, and ways of eating (WOE). Find community. I formed a group called “The Sugar Mamas” we meet for lunch and keep each other sane. Keep an eye on the online community of diabetes: GLU, CGM in the Cloud, CDN and especially TYPEONEGRIT are all important networks with helpful people, many who have great ideas and inspiration. Most are going through what you are going through. Strength in numbers!

Finally, keep your dreams for your child’s success alive. Encourage them to reach. Encourage yourself to stay strong. Play the song “You’re an Overcomer” really, really loud ! Don’t forget to have fun. If one day is terrible, try again the next day. Look for a sliver of humor in the crazy diabetes things that happen. And don’t forget to pray for the day when we all wake up to the front page headline ” A Cure for Type 1 diabetes has been found”.


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