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Gym and Lifting Weights with Diabetes

Gym and Lifting Weights With Diabetes

By: Taylor Pierce


I remember sitting at my desk in the third grade and having the constant thought of, “why am I feeling this type of way?” The constant rush to make it to the bathroom and the question that ran through my mind constantly was, am I supposed to be on this Earth to be a fish?

I remember thinking this because I wasn’t content with just a gulp of water, I wanted the entire ocean I was so thirsty. I remember at the age of eight I always felt weak, but I continued to try my best to compete in competitions with cheerleading and hauling booty on the basketball court, but something wasn’t right. I was weak, pale and exhausted.

We put aside my health and would just take it day by day, until one night after a basketball game. We went to a restaurant that served food that you would never want to pass up. I didn’t eat a single thing and trust me, I’m the type of girl who loves to eat, especially carbs. My mom and dad sat me down and began to question me. “Taylor what is wrong?” they would ask.

I didn’t know what was wrong.

Finally on December 13th I was admitted to Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at the age of eight.

My blood sugar hit 1,100. I wanted to die and I was angry. I remember asking myself, “How am I even alive right now?” I knew exactly why, it was because of my wonderful savior, Jesus Christ.

I remember after two weeks in the hospital, I had the mindset of how I didn’t want diabetes. I attended camp Kudzu and would mentor kids my age with diabetes. A lot of people have asked me, “How do you still act happy through all the trials of your life with all the issues that your body faces?” I simply knew I didn’t have to face this alone, and that is where it all started and I wanted to beat diabetes.

I would research diabetes and do many projects on the disease. I would find articles on the death rates and percentages of complications and it scared me. I was scared until I knew that my body was capable of big things.

I also had younger eyes watching me. My younger sister was also diagnosed with diabetes and it broke my heart. I knew I had to fight this disease, be strong, be bold and be an influence to her and others. I didn’t know how to stay healthy and keep my mind strong until I hit the gym.

I have never in my life felt so close to a cure then I do when I’m at the gym.

There were nights that I would cry because I couldn’t make it to the gym. The gym allowed me to escape. Everything went away, my problems and my insecurities and I am so excited to eventually work towards competing in power lifting competitions.

My boyfriend is a Personal Trainer and has pushed me in the gym. I’ve never wanted to work so hard until I started to see myself grow. From my deadlifts starting at 66 lbs to 155lbs within weeks to bench press, and squats, I saw progress and that’s what I started to get addicted to.

If I could give advice to anyone with diabetes in the gym I would tell them to take care of yourself and to take breaks if you need to. I have lost almost 11% of body fat since I have been lifting weights. My A1C has dropped five points, and I cannot wait to watch my body grow even more!

gym and lifting weights with diabetes

This has been the healthiest I have ever been since becoming a diabetic (and a “Gym Rat” as they call me) . I have also decided to pursue my career in Nursing.

I have had my ups and downs, but diabetes has taught me so much.

I would say having this disease for thirteen years has made me super blessed. I will never let diabetes control me and I will always have the upper hand.

A piece of scripture that keeps me moving forward and that I always keep in mind is:

“So do not fear, for I am with you; do not be dismayed, for I am your God. I will strengthen you and help you; I will uphold you with my righteous right hand” Isaiah 41:10

Until Type One turns into Type “None”, I will never let this disease win. Find that inner fighter in you and join me in beating what the statistics have fed to us.



 

A Night In The Life Of a Type 1 Diabetic

I wrote this poem last night at 3 a.m. Seems like almost every night I am up at that time. Truth be told though I am not alone. Multitudes of others share a similar experience when caring for someone with this disease. If you know someone with Type 1 Diabetes and they are managing it so well know that there is a whole lot of hard work behind it.


A Night In The Life of a Type 1 Diabetic

By: Mary Williams

Now I lay me down to sleep,
I pray to God I catch some Zzz’s.
The first alarm goes off at 12
Time to make sure all is still well

A blood sugar reading of 65.
Time to down juice to keep her alive.
“Wake up sleepy head, it’s that time of night
Wake up so momma can make you alright.”

15 minutes later its time to re-poke
A drop of blood reveals its time for some Coke
Still too low to go to bed.
So we patiently wait to lay our weary heads.

15 minutes go by and the Alarm bell rings
Another drop of blood…141 it sings.
Set the alarm to wake up at 3.
My head hits the pillow and my alarm startles me.

Another drop of blood into the machine.
350 is what it now currently screams!
Freakity Frack!
I want our old lives back.

Time for a shot to bring them back down.
Set the alarm for 6 this time around.
My head hits the pillow its time for a snooze.
The alarm interrupts The Rock giving me booze,

On a nice sandy beach, enjoying a walk.
The alarms jolts me back to type 1 diabetes talk.
Another drop of blood says she needs to wake up.
65 again! This royally sucks.

night in the life of a type 1 diabetic

Time to down juice, we know the routine
I hate this disease, it makes me feel mean.
Another drop of blood is what I request
From small little hands that are trying their best

To be brave when the needles cause so much pain
Fingers riddled with scars is what has been gained
And now its time to start a brand new day,
With one step forward, there’s no other way.

Sleep is for the privileged and caffeine is on ice
A cure for type 1 diabetes sure would be nice.
To be rid of the burden that this disease brings
Would ease this mommy’s mind and end my baby’s suffering.


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“Diabetes Isn’t Even That Bad”

“Diabetes Isn’t Even That Bad” …

When I hear this statement it frustrates me. Not because I wish to allow someone’s opinion or thoughts to affect my life.

Not because it is the worst possible condition, because I know it’s not.

I’m extremely thankful for everyday I’m alive, the technology, advancements, and the chance to live a long life.

But because of how UNTRUE that statement actually is when you truly understand the disease.

Diabetes doesn’t seem bad until it enters your life…

Diabetes is when your body basically wages war on itself. In Type 1 Diabetes the immune system attacks the cells in the pancreas and no longer produces insulin. Now it is an everyday battle to maintain normal blood sugars that affect how we feel, our moods, and how we are able to function.

Diabetes is where children are dying from diabetic ketoacidosis because the doctors thought the child had the flu.

Diabetes is where parents are not able to sleep throughout the night, constantly checking their child’s blood sugar, being in fear of their child having a seizure or going into a coma.

Diabetes is where you wake up in the middle of the night drenched in sweat, feeling lost and confused, and having to fight to save your own life by guzzling juice or eating whatever you have nearby.

Diabetes is being dependent on an insulin that costs more than most people pay per month for mortgage. Having to find ways to make food stretch so that you don’t have to go without your insulin to stay alive.

Diabetes is constantly having your eyes, kidneys, and feet checked to see how the diabetes is affecting your body. There is always the risk of complications and the unknown is scary.

Diabetes is finding yourself exhausted all the time, fighting through some really bad days and wishing you could be healthy again.

Diabetes is where you’re constantly managing a disease that will never get better. You sometimes beat yourself up for the lows and high blood sugars, but deep down you know you’re doing the best you can.

Diabetes is having people say “lose weight” or “try this diet” and it will go away. Or someone telling a parent their child’s diabetes was caused by “eating too much sugar”.

Diabetes is living with a disease that could cost you your life while politicians blame the people who have diabetes for costing the healthcare system money. As if it’s our fault that our immune system decided to attack our pancreas.

Diabetes is life-threatening, costly, and an all-consuming disease. And the more we acknowledge “the bad”, the more we can change how this disease is perceived and can help those who battle it everyday.



 

A Positive Outlook Leads To a Positive Outcome

A Positive Outlook Leads To a Positive Outcome

Anita Brown

http://anitanicolebrown.com/


My name is Anita Nicole Brown and I am an 18 year Type 1 DiaBadAss! On November 12th, 2017 I will be celebrating 19 years with this disease and I will be celebrating!

I want to change the perspective of what it means to be a Type 1 Diabetic!

So how do I plan on doing that? By celebrating everything I have learned since being diagnosed with T1D and by bringing attention to this disease so that others can see the strength we actually have!

So my story is simple:

I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes on November 12th, 1998 (my father’s birthday and an A1C of 28)! Shortly after, I was also diagnosed with diabetic nerve damage in my legs and feet that cost me the ability to walk for about a year!

Now, this was in no way caused by me or how I was taking care of myself. It was later determined that my diabetes should have been discovered in 8th grade. However, it was not diagnosed until my senior year of high school! And because it went so long without treatment, the nerve damage set in.

As you can guess, it was a difficult time! I mean it was my senior year of high school! A time I was to be excited about prom, homecoming, graduation and college! Instead I spent most of my senior year either at home or in the hospital! And I was so afraid that because of this disease, I would not graduate!

But, I do believe I am a bit too stubborn for that to have been the end of my story! See, when my doctors told me it was a possibility that the nerve damage would never go away and I may see permanent damage….. I was not in agreement!

So I kept fighting.

Kept working at getting my levels in order and learning as much as I could about this new disease. And one morning I woke and my nerve damage had gone away! I do not think I can express the feeling of being able to walk, run, dance without help or assistance or pain!

And to graduate 2nd in my class after all that! But that was not the end of this battle with T1D! There was more to come that (at 18) I could not have been prepared for! You see, I also found myself dealing with many failed pregnancies and even a thyroid problem and even more!

It got to the point that I felt that life was not worth living if this was going to be my life! And I did try to end it all. I did throw in the towel! I remember when I came to this decision and I told God (or whatever power above you believe in) that I could not continue. That it was too hard.

But, I also told Him that if I woke the next morning….. I would know I had a purpose. A reason for being. As you can see I did wake the next morning. And I woke with perfect glucose levels! As I saw this I looked up to God and said: “Message received….. Just tell me what You have in store for me!”

From that moment, I knew I was stronger than I had given myself credit for.I knew I was given this disease because I could handle it. I can learn from it and I can grow! And that has been my mission!

I know how hard it is to have this disease. To constantly have to count carbs, make insulin adjustments, keep up with doctor’s appointments and pay attention to what my body is telling me! It is a JOB! But I now confront it with a positivity I did not have in the beginning!

Instead of being angry or upset, I look to find the positive!

And the biggest positive is the fact that I woke up this morning when so many did not! This tells me I have more to do! That my reason for being has not been fulfilled!

So I decided to go even further! I mean why not be a T1D Actress, Model, Action Fighter? I mean who says we can’t do these things and still be upfront about our disease? Still keep people informed! Still spread awareness? When I was 17 and trying to find someone….. ANYONE I could look to, I had NO ONE!

I am the only type 1 in my family so when I was learning and dealing with this….. I felt so alone! Now, I know I am not alone and I love the strength this T1D community has! I want to show the good and the bad with being a type 1 diabetic. And I hope that by showing both sides, the good is what can be seen and looked up to more!

We are so much stronger than we know and give ourselves credit for! We were given this task of balancing our lives around this disease and making it look….. easy even when it is not! But I know we were selected because we have that power….. we ARE that power!

We may never be “normal” and that is a beautiful thing! No one who has ever accomplished anything was considered “normal”! So let’s let be loud….. Let’s be vocal and show this world how DiaBadAss we truly are! We have the power to tell our story…… So let’s tell it!



 

teenager with type 1 diabetes

Teenager With Type 1 Diabetes –

Teenager With Type 1 Diabetes –

By: Sarah Ball


I was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes just nine days before my thirteenth birthday. I was excited to start a new chapter of my life. I was about to start my last year of middle school and officially become a teenager.

Becoming a teenager is rough. We all know it. At this point in your life, you’re so desperate to slip under the radar and fit in as much as possible. And with something that resembles a pager on my waist, it became difficult to fit in.

For my first year of diagnosis, I had to go to the nurse’s office everyday to give myself an injection after lunch. I remember clearly a classmate of mine being in the nurse’s office when I gave an injection one day.

He later called me out in front of my entire class asking “why did you give yourself an Epipen shot earlier?” I didn’t know how to respond. I was frozen. My teacher, who overheard the conversation, tried to change the subject and move on. That was the first of many times in that first year that I was humiliated for being different.

Later in the year one of my friends, who didn’t know I was diabetic, saw me check my blood sugar. She immediately asked me what my meter was. I froze again. I felt that same rush of humility. I ignored her.

Later that day, she messaged me and I explained that I was a diabetic and I didn’t want her to think I was a freak because I wasn’t like everyone else. She responded with compassion and explained how she would have never thought that, even if I am different. I started to feel better about being different after that conversation.

The first year of high school was also the first year I had an insulin pump.

I noticed as I walked down the hall, people would eye my waist, where my insulin pump would sit everyday. I felt that same rush of humility, yet again. I became embarrassed by diabetes again.

So much so, I stopped checking my blood sugar everyday at school. This made my A1C levels rise, but I didn’t care. This increased blood sugar spikes during the day which affected my performance in school, but I didn’t care. I would accidentally give too much insulin, which would plummet my blood sugars, but I didn’t care.

I risked my health to seem normal. It became unhealthy. It was affecting my grades, my mental health and of course, my physical well being. As I grew up and realized that differences are what make us interesting, I started to embrace diabetes.

I started to be proud that I was one of the 3 million people in the United States to have Type 1 Diabetes and empower people to not be embarrassed by something that they can’t control.

After 5 years with diabetes, I still notice the stares in public when I check my blood sugar. And notice people staring at my waist, but my outlook has changed. I wear my insulin pump proudly and answer questions with confidence. I help people understand that it isn’t uncommon or weird.

Diabetes is difficult as it is, don’t make it more difficult by trying to pretend you’re someone you’re not. Embrace the 1 AM lows, embrace the subconscious carb counting, embrace the impromptu insulin pump site changes in public. It’s apart of who we are. And it’s okay to be a bit different.



 

type 1 diabetes diagnosis

Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis and Things They Don’t Tell You

Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis and Things They Don’t Tell You


This is a topic I’ve wanted to write about for awhile. When receiving my Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis well over a decade ago—it was all just a blur in my mind. I remember the significant parts. I remember feeling ill and being told that I had type 1 diabetes. But it was also a moment of sheer disbelief, fear, and confusion.

Being in the ICU with DKA is not a place anyone wants to be. It’s hard to fully process a type 1 diabetes diagnosis in just a short hospital stay. What are the questions that I need to ask? What does this all entail? The doctors and mostly nurses just spilling information and I couldn’t grasp all of it, if any.

At the time of my diagnosis I learned the basics. Which was how to inject myself with insulin or how to have the assistance of my mother. I learned how to check my blood sugar, how often, and what the numbers meant.

But being at the hospital is like having a babysitter. Someone, a medical professional who can keep an eye on you until you leave. It’s when you leave the hospital—that’s when the real work comes into play. And it’s a lot more complex then I could have ever anticipated.

 

Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis and Things They Don’t Tell You:

 

How Consistently Inconsistent Life Now Is

After I went home I was still in the honeymoon phase and my body responded well to the insulin. But after the honeymoon phase wore off, it was chaotic for many years following. During the teen years not only was I growing but I was also combating hormones. Now I know that diabetes is constantly changing and so is my day to day insulin requirements.

I soon learned how volatile my blood sugars can actually be. That even if I eat and inject myself with the same amount of insulin everyday, the results can vary. It didn’t happen overnight, but over the years I learned how to adjust and find certain trends.

My accuracy is NEVER perfect, but I take pride in making small improvements. Thankfully now I have a CGM (continuous glucose monitor) which helps me keep a closer eye on where my blood sugar is headed before it becomes severely life-threatening.

How Strong You’re Going To Have To Be

I don’t know if I was this strong to begin or I had strength thrust upon me due to necessity. But I’ve become incredibly strong due to having diabetes. I’ve learned to react in life-threatening situations, save my own life everyday, and to embrace the uncertainty. I was never prepared for how strong I’d have to be. It’s definitely not for the weak, and in many ways it’s made me the person I am today.

 

How Much Sleep You’re Going To Lose

When I was diagnosed my mother took the brunt of the work. I don’t think a physician has to really suggest “sleep-less” or “wake up at this time” because it’s almost instinctual. As I got a little older I started taking the reigns and I’ve been going ever since.

The feeling of exhaustion never seems to go away. I still find myself 15 years down the line going to bed late or wake up at odd hours. I don’t think it will ever stop. But I do take comfort in knowing that while it has taken a lot from me, I still manage to live beyond it.

 

How To Cope With The Emotional Challenges

There’s a lot more that goes into managing diabetes then the physical stuff. But I wasn’t prepared for everything else that would follow. The frustration, depression, anxiety, sadness, anger, guilt, shame, fear, burnout, all of it. Some has comes in spurts, some even all at once.

One day I can be absolutely fine, and then the next day I feel utterly defeated. I once thought that I was the only one who felt like this because my doctors never really mentioned how diabetes can affect ones emotions.

I used to think that showing weakness was a sign of failure. That I have to constantly live up to expectations and be evaluated on how well I’m doing and how I can improve. But what I’ve learned is that I’m still here, and if I’m still here I’m giving it my all. I’ve learned to turn my weaknesses into a strength, share and relate with those going through the same thing, and find ways to continue to better myself.

diabetes and the unexpected - diabetes blog week

How To Face The World

When I received my type 1 diabetes diagnosis —I didn’t know what diabetes was. I knew about as much as what most learn on television. But instead of making small or moderate lifestyle changes to manage my condition, my life COMPLETELY changed.

Diabetes is seen as a “fat persons disease”, that someone ate too much sugar, is overweight, and doesn’t exercise. However, I wasn’t any of those things. I learned that I had an autoimmune disease which no one in my family had. I learned quickly how little people actually know about diabetes.

I now was forced to inject myself everyday with insulin, watch the amount of carbs I eat, and closely monitor blood sugar levels. But what was even harder was feeling accepted for my diabetes. I soon learned I wasn’t like other children or teens. It was hard to adjust going back to school, socializing, and being active. People would make jokes or tease me for using syringes. For awhile I felt ashamed for having diabetes and I felt like I needed to hide it.

As I’ve grown older, I realize that not everyone is going to have empathy or understand my condition. And when someone doesn’t understand, it can also make them feel uncomfortable. But what diabetes has given me is the compassion and empathy to understand those who do have diabetes and other health conditions.

I’ve learned to rise above the stigma, the judgment, the cruelty and live out my own purpose. To raise awareness, to bring light to a difficult situation, and to let others know they are not alone.



 

silver lining of chronic illness

The Silver Lining of Chronic Illness – Something Good That Can Be Found In a Bad Situation

Silver Lining Of Chronic Illness – Something Good That Can Be Found In a Bad Situation

By: Kylie Whitten


3 years ago I was a happy, healthy, carefree 20 year old. Fast forward three years, and I’m a happy, (somewhat) healthy, (somewhat) carefree 23 year old, who just happens to have type one diabetes. I don’t think it ever crosses anyone’s mind that one day you will get sick and never get better. It happens though.

At first I was going to write about all the bad parts of type one diabetes (because let’s face it there is a lot). I was going to write about what it took from me and how hard it has been on me.

But I’m not.

I refuse to let this chronic illness take anything else from me, including my happiness. So instead I’m going to focus on the silver linings of type one diabetes.

Becoming chronically ill changes you.

Your life turns around, and you suddenly don’t know left from right. Life becomes messy (as if it wasn’t already messy enough), and hard to navigate. But life also becomes more clearer.

You take advantage of the good days, because sometimes they are few and far between, and you learn to not sweat the bad. If I didn’t appreciate things enough before diabetes, I promise you I do now.

Diabetes has made me a stronger person. I know what I’m capable of now, & I don’t let anything stop me. I know what I want out of life, & nothing will get in my way of that. Not even diabetes.

Not everything about diabetes is unfortunate. I have bad days but I’m constantly reminded that the good outweighs the bad. I’ve truly found myself these last three years. I’ve loved a lot harder, and learned that surrounding yourself with people that get and stick around when life gets messy, is good for your soul.

I understand now that something I can’t control will not control my happiness. There is always a silver lining, you just have to find it. Even if it takes you awhile.



 

What I’ve Learned From My Child Who Battles Type 1 Diabetes

By: Kirsten White


I learned how to be brave.
I learned how to stay strong.
I learned how to stare fear in the face with a giggle and a smile.
I learned what life is all about.
I learned what a hero really is.
I learned what a fighter does.
I learned what courage feels like.
I learned what unstoppable means.

I am the mother, I am supposed to teach my son these things.

But this T1D life has brought a new perspective. The long sleepless nights. The math skills I never knew I possessed. The gut wrenching fear of highs and lows, pertaining to both blood glucose readings and the events of the day.

The planning. The prescriptions. The doctors appointments. The technology. The sticks and pokes, and new things to carry on his body. He has faced them all with a smile.

Even on our three day stay in the hospital at diagnosis, he was running and playing with a smile, and singing, his favorite country stars songs, Jamey Johnson to everyone. He was the talk of the hospital wing.

He shows off his gear with pride now everywhere we go. He gets excited to see kids wearing gear like his at all the events we attend to raise money and awareness. He hasn’t let a thing stop him. He even shows off his Tae Kwon Do skills wearing his gear to win his first trophy.

I want him to always have such a bright and happy outlook on life. To grow and learn about his disease and to educate others. I pray nothing in this life will ever put a damper on those big blue eyes, and those dimples.

Yes, my three year old has been the tough one, the strong one, the brave one.

He has taught my family how life should be faced no matter what is thrown at you. He is my hero, better than Batman. For the rest of my life I will fight along side him until there is a cure! 



 

dear brand new d mom

Dear Brand New D Mom,

Dear Brand New D Mom,

I know when you looked at your child for the very first time the day they were born you never expected a day like the day they told you your child was sick and they’d never get better. I know you had hopes and dreams and Type 1 Diabetes has seemingly taken away all the aspirations you had for your child.

I know you are scared.

You feel like you no longer have control of your life. You can’t take away the pain that is inflicted daily to your child. You in no way can make this better.

You didn’t cause it, but you can’t fix it. That in itself has left you feeling broken and useless.

You feel weak because you are broken, but I’d like to tell you that it’s just simply not the case. You have a strength in you that you didn’t know was there. Type 1 Diabetes isn’t who your child is and they will continue to amaze you daily.

 

You will begin to realize your child will be as amazing as you’d always dreamed WITH Type 1 Diabetes.

You are a fighter and so is your child. Type 1 is a diagnosis that breaks you in a way no one but D parents understand. I am now a year into the fight that you are just beginning. I remember being glued to Google and Calorie King, logging endlessly doses and carb intakes and feeling like that was the most control I had at the time.

My heart ached with every dose of insulin I put into my child.

I spent countless nights sobbing into my pillow, hiding in the bathroom letting the water run to mask the my broken cries. We all go through those nights. We all sleep with our newly diagnosed child close by just to make sure we don’t miss a low, to try and protect them from the demons that cloud our ever waking and sleeping moments.

Let me be one of the people who tell you that YOU ARE GOING TO MAKE IT.

This is hard, but you are a Warrior Mom alongside your Warrior Child. You don’t see it in yourself right now, but its there and when the dust settles you will see that this fight never became easier,

YOU BECAME STRONGER. From one D Mom to another, YOU GOT THIS!

– Ashlea Mello

Also Written: The “D” World and What It Means To Be a Mother Of a Child With Diabetes


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This Is My Life Support, This Is Type 1 Diabetes

This Is My Life Support, This Is Type 1 Diabetes

By: Katharine Orona

Instagram: @this_is_type_1_diabetes | Blog: thisistype1diabetes


10 years ago I was only a few weeks away from having my life turned upside down and changed forever. I was only weeks away from being diagnosed with an incurable disease, one I didn’t bring upon myself, and one I knew nothing about.

I was about to be diagnosed with Type 1 (LADA) Diabetes.

I had been the picture of health. Perfect blood work results at every checkup, thin, and young. I was 26 years old, about to get married, and recently promoted at work. It was then that I thought I had everything under control and everything seemed to be perfect.

I had all the classic symptoms but didn’t know what they meant: extreme thirst, frequent urination, and rapid unexplained weight loss (at 5 feet tall, I went from 106 lbs to 90 lbs in less than 3 months). My doctor knew right away it was diabetes when I went in with my symptoms. I went to the ER, was immediately admitted, and spent 5 days at the hospital.

After that it took me 5 years to come to terms with my disease.

5 years to go through anger, denial, and grief over losing a life I had known for 26 years. 5 years to decide I was ready to start using a different form of treatment, an insulin pump.

I was so resistant to this technology. I saw it as life support, I saw it as a restriction, I saw it as something I would have to conceal and be ashamed about. When I was finally ready and took the plunge, I loved it from day one. To my surprise, it was freeing, not restricting.

life support

It is life support, but I am thankful for it.

However, I still felt the need to conceal it. I dreaded being asked questions about it or having people wonder why I was wearing a pager (90s folks you know what that is). I felt embarrassed that I needed something to live that other people did not. It took a long time to own it.

A few years later when I was pregnant with my son and my doctor suggested a continuous glucose monitor I went through the same feelings all over again. Another medical device? More things that will make it harder for me to pick an outfit that can conceal that too? But, I knew I had to do it so I did.

My son was worth every awkward stare and every question I faced.

These are tools that I use to make my life a tiny bit more normal. They keep me alive. When my son was born 5 weeks before his due date, and I later made the connection, I realized that he was born on the 6th anniversary of my diabetes diagnosis, at the same hospital I spent those first 5 days after diagnosis.

That fateful day in 2007 that I thought was the worst day of my life, turned out to be the best day of my life 6 years later.

Today I can finally say I not only wear my medical devices with pride, I rock them.

And no matter what method of treatment you choose, know that it’s keeping you alive and you are stronger because of it. Feel comfortable with whatever makes you different. Because it makes you YOU.

As Dr Seuss once said: “Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.”


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